Evolution of the Family

The five-year-old sitcom Modern Family is multi-awarded for good reason. For six seasons, the show has consistently delivered solid acting, hilarious writing, and, as the name implies, refreshing unconventionality. Modern Family’s tagline basically sums up its premise: “One big (straight, gay, multi-cultural, traditional) happy family.” The mockumentary-style sitcom revolves around the family of Jay Pritchett and his two children, Clair and Mitchell. It starts of introducing Jay as he recently remarries to a younger Colombian woman, Gloria; Clair has been married for 20 years with her college lover, Phil; and Mitchell living-in with his partner, Cameron. Continue reading Evolution of the Family

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A SOGIE Analysis of How I Met Your Mother

Marshall and Lily to their newborn son: “You’re gonna love the park, buddy. It’s a great place to meet chicks. Or-or dudes. Or both.” “Oh, we love you no matter what.” How I Met Your Mother (HIMYM) generally shows this kind of acceptance towards the LGBTQ through plot lines and characterization that does not make a fuss over sexual orientation and identity. Continue reading A SOGIE Analysis of How I Met Your Mother

A feminist analysis of How I Met Your Mother’s final episode

How I Met Your Mother is an American sitcom that originally ran from September 2005 to March 2014, reaching nine seasons. As the title suggests, the program is about Ted Mosby narrating the story of how he met his wife as he tells it to his children. While this is the framework of the plot, the program focused on Ted and his friends Marshall, Barney, Lily, and Robin and their adventures as a gang. Other minor story arcs include Marshall and Lily’s husband-and-wife relationship, Barney’s womanizing antics, Ted and Robin’s relationship Barney and Robin’s relationship, among others.

Continue reading A feminist analysis of How I Met Your Mother’s final episode

Who’s That Girl?: A Feminist Analysis of New Girl

The main tenet of the feminist movement is its belief that “all women are free to do whatever they want to do with themselves without discrimination or judgment from anybody ever (all women including straight, queer, lesbian, bi, trans, asexual)” (Ambion, 2014). This can be achieved only by the ever-sought for concept of equality among sexes: equal opportunities, be it in careers or personal choices; the dismantling of sexism, discrimination, and stereotyping; and the end of the patriarchal system that still runs the world today. Continue reading Who’s That Girl?: A Feminist Analysis of New Girl

“How I Met Your Mother? Oh really” A Feminist Analysis on the Three Main Female Characters

When I started watching How I Met Your Mother I really enjoyed it. After every episode, I get excited whenever I try to guess who the mother is. The show was funny and did not require so much critical thinking, at first. I looked up to the main female characters in the show because of their strong personalities as women. However, in the long run, I lost interest and simply got disappointed with the way these women were portrayed. The ending was a failure. Others may argue otherwise, but in my opinion, for someone who continuously watched the show from the pilot episode to the ending, it was not the ending I expected or hoped for. Continue reading “How I Met Your Mother? Oh really” A Feminist Analysis on the Three Main Female Characters

Feminist Criticism of 2 Broke Girls

2 Broke Girls is a sitcom which revolves around the lives of Max Black and Caroline Channing as they try to run a cupcake business with the hopes of making them financially stable. Caroline is the daughter of Martin Channing, a businessman who was involved in a Ponzi scheme which robbed the entire state of New York. Because of this incident, Caroline is left broke and desperate in looking for a job. On the other hand, Max is a waitress in the Williamsburg diner and has spent most of her professional life waiting tables. The two girls cross paths when Caroline becomes a waitress in the same diner–and inevitably becomes Max’s roommate. The two girls devise a plan to capitalize on Max’s baking skills and Caroline’s business background in order to build a successful cupcake business–while handling the idiosyncrasies of their personal lives. Continue reading Feminist Criticism of 2 Broke Girls

A Critical Analysis on the (not so) Modern Family

The award winning sitcom, Modern Family, debuted on ABC on September 2009. The program follows the lives of three interconnected families in suburban Los Angeles. The show combines traditional and new elements to produce a blended discourse to its viewers.

Continue reading A Critical Analysis on the (not so) Modern Family